Community Relations    Richland County School District Two is located in the Northeast corner of Richland County, in Columbia, South Carolina. Richland County School District Two (RCSD 2) is the largest school district in the Midlands (the middle area of the state of South Carolina), with a student population of nearly 28,500 students Pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district is comprised of 41 schools (5 high schools, 7 middle schools, 20 elementary schools, 4 magnet centers, 1 child development center, 1 charter school, 1 alternative school, 1 adult education center, 1 Institute of Innovation center) serving a diverse community. For the purpose of this survey 10 RCSD2 community members were surveyed to gain a thorough understanding of school and community relationships as it pertains to Richland County School District Two, specifically Richland Northeast High School.ParticipantsOn January 17, 2018, ten community members participated in the Community Relations Survey, at the conclusion of a band booster meeting. The survey was distributed by Roderick Henderson a student at Arkansas State University. Participants completed an 8 page, 29 question survey.Participant 1: SJ – Approximate Age: 30+ , Gender: Female, Race: African-American, Occupation: Curriculum Coordinator, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Baptist), Economic Status: Upper Middle ClassParticipant 2: AS – Approximate Age: 40+ , Gender: Female, Race: African-American, Occupation: Educator, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Apostolic), Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 3: SH – Approximate Age: 50+ , Gender: Female, Race: African-American, Occupation: Retired Military, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Non-Denominational), Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 4: JD – Approximate Age: 40+ , Gender: Male, Race: African-American, Occupation: Educator/Coach, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Baptist), Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 5: HR – Approximate Age: 40+ , Gender: Female Race: Caucasian, Occupation: Community Swim Teacher, Religious Affiliation: Catholic, Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 6: SB – Approximate Age: 30+ , Gender: Female Race: Greek-American, Occupation: Homemaker , Religious Affiliation: Christian (Baptist), Economical Status: Upper Middle ClassParticipant 7: TC – Approximate Age: 30+ , Gender: Male Race: African-American, Occupation: Self Employed, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Baptist), Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 8: FA – Approximate Age: 30+ , Gender: Female Race: Pacific Islander, Occupation: Human Resources Director, Religious Affiliation: Christian , Economic Status: Middle Class Participant 9: MF – Approximate Age: 30+ , Gender: Male Race: Latino/Hispanic, Occupation: Machinist, Religious Affiliation: Christian (Baptist), Economic Status: Middle ClassParticipant 10: JS – Approximate Age: 70+ , Gender: Female Race: Caucasian, Occupation: Unemployed, Religious Affiliation: Christian, Economic Status: Middle ClassSummary of ResultsThe first cluster of questions surveyed the participants on the subject of standardized testing. Survey response indicates that participants were knowledgeable about the importance of school standardized testing. One hundred percent of participant agreed that students engaged in class work was at minimum important and students scores received on standardized testing is very important. Seventy percent of the participants agreed that there was too much of an emphasis on testing in their public school community. Six of participants answered examples of the students work provided the most accurate picture of the public school student’s academic progress. When asked about the favor or opposition to teacher evaluations on student performance the participants were split, five in favor and 5 in opposition.The second cluster of questions was centered around the topic of common core. Four of the ten participants remembered common core standards. Few participants had heard of the common core due to it being replaced in 2016 with South Carolina State College – and Career Readiness Curriculum. The third cluster of questions pertained to School Choice. Participants were decidedly in favor of school choice. Participants were also in favor of parents of choice within public school regardless of where the parent/student may live. Sixty percent of parents answered they had enough information about the different public schools in this community. One parent (SB) stated that this district does a really good job of highlighting all of the schools via a magnet information night held annually for parents and students. Most participants chose somewhat important or very important for the following questions as it pertains to school choice: quality of the teaching staff, maintaining student discipline, size of the class, a variety of extracurricular activities, and proximately to home. The last cluster of questions was about local schools and national schools. All participants gave their local public schools a grade of B (6 participants) or an A (4 participants). When asked to give a grade for the nation’s school participants answered as follows: one grade of C, 7 grades of D, and 2 grades of fail. The failure score was also given by two male participants. All participant agreed that the federal and state governments should responsible for funding schools. Eight participants selected local government should hold schools accountable for what they learn. When questioned about who should determine the right amount of testing, six participants selected the state should determine the right amount of testing, five selected the federal government should determine the right amount of testing, and one participant selected local government should determine the right amount of testing. When questioned about the biggest problem the public school in the community must deal with lack of financial support was most selected followed by lack of parental support and testing regulations.ConclusionIn conclusion, this survey revealed a lot of information on how the community views the public schools in RCSD Two. As an educator, I am glad to see that the participants answers reveals the responsibility of a high-quality equitable education has shared the responsibility of student, parents, educators, and government.